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Lone Worker Protection

Without lone worker protection an organization runs the risk of experiencing serious financial reparations, it could receive negative brand perception which could also affect its ability to attract the best staff and customers.

 Lone Worker ProtectionDuty of care is a shared responsibility between a lone worker and their employer, however it has never been more important for an organization to fulfill their responsibility. Without lone worker protection an organization runs the risk of experiencing serious financial reparations, it could receive negative brand perception which could also affect its ability to attract the best staff and customers. As well as this, any accidents, injuries or deaths of lone workers investigated by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and found to be resultant of breaches in either The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, or The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, may lead to significant fines being placed on an organization. Equipping your staff with a SoloProtect lone worker solution can significantly reduce your business risk.

Whilst working alone is perfectly legal, employers owe all staff a duty of care, and as such they need to consider the risks to that worker's safety in the workplace. Lone worker policies are becoming increasingly common and lone worker safety training, along with lone worker monitoring devices and protection technology, have become a significant tool to maximize an organisation’s duty of care. Many companies have adopted a progressive approach to protecting their employees and with the SoloProtect Identicom device you can provide a comprehensive and affordable solution to meet this need.

When sending lone workers out into a progressively hostile environment, it’s possible they may come face to face with conflict or potential hostile situations. Therefore, lone worker protection is essential and health & safety professionals must be sure to take every precaution; the protection and security of their workforce must be afforded the utmost consideration.

In addition to the numerous risks that are posed to lone working individuals, it’s also worth considering the level of risk and liability carried by the organisation. In 2016, the Sentencing Council introduced new guidelines relating to all breaches in Health and Safety, and Corporate Manslaughter legislation, resulting in convictions sentenced from 1st February 2016 onwards. All fines levied are increasing significantly, and are now directly linked to the level of culpability to an individual or organisation, and the financial situation of that individual or business. Not protecting staff who work alone is a serious business risk; it can affect a company’s cash position, share price and brand equity and should therefore be taken extremely seriously.